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In 2004, Linux® was a lot like OpenStack® is today. OpenStack is growing fast, supported by a community of individuals and enterprises, and creates a standard platform we can all use to build open, massively scalable clouds. That's why we believe OpenStack represents the best of what cloud technology offers.

IT without Boundaries

There are 2 worlds in IT today, and Red Hat can help you face this new reality, and ensure both will thrive. Find out more here: http://www.redhat.com/infrastructure

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Red Hat and OpenStack: The true meaning of support

OpenStack is a powerful technology that unites and enhances countless other technologies. Harnessing this innovation to build a cloud you can run your business on requires a substantial expertise, but supporting that cloud—into the long term—is an even greater challenge. And Red Hat takes this challenge seriously, with real people who stand behind our support. That’s the value of a Red Hat subscription. That’s the power of OpenStack.

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FICO builds for the future with OpenShift by Red Hat on OpenStack

FICO knows big data analytics, knows that OpenStack® is the future for elastic infrastructure, and knows how to pick an OpenStack partner for its next-generation FICO Analytic Cloud.Click here to watch the full success story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TX1OGHd1M0

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Dualtec excels with first Brazilian public cloud offering built on OpenStack

Dualtec released the first public cloud offering based on OpenStack in the Brazilian market. “It’s the foundation for creating new jobs in Iaas and PaaS that we’re offering to our customers,” said Dualtec’s CEO, Lauro De Lauro. Dualtec experienced 25% reduction of hardware costs and dramatic gains in efficiency. http://www.dualtec.com.br/openstack/Learn more about Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform: http://www.redhat.com/en/technologies/linux-platforms/openstack-platform

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From community to enterprise-ready: Red Hat’s momentum with OpenStack

The open development model is only successful if you are as committed to the community as you are to the products you create. Our primary goal was to become truly integrated in the OpenStack community. Now, we are excited about getting OpenStack in the hands of many. Hear what Red Hat has to say about their momentum around OpenStack.

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Infographic: Red Hat All In Openstack

For the past 20 years, the Red Hat® open source software developmentmodel has produced high-performance, cost effective solutions. Our modelmirrors the highly interconnected world we live in and takes advantage ofthe ability to share ideas and information worldwide, in seconds. It allowsour customers to enjoy the highest levels of technology innovation whileremaining aligned with real-world business requirements.

Infographic: 2016 Tech Trends Survey Results

We asked 10 questions of 727 Red Hat® customers, including 8 CEOs, 60+ senior leaders, and 600+ IT and engineering professionals across 60 countries.

How OpenStack is paralleling Linux adoption (and how it isn’t)

OpenStack is paralleling and will likely continue to parallel the adoption of another open source project that has become enormously popular and successful—namely Linux. The parallels are educational and useful in that they lend insight into the rate at which adoption takes place and what we might expect successful adoption to look like. At the same time, this session will provide appropriate caveats about assuming that OpenStack can be viewed as just a latter-day Linux. By applying this sort of historical perspective, we can better understand what might be the most effective approaches to collaboration, community-building, and cooperation moving forward.

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Executive Brief: Accelerate Enterprise Openstack Deployment With Red Hat And Cisco

Cloud technologies like OpenStack® deliver the flexibility, agility, and cost-effectiveness IT organizations need. In fact, a recent IDG survey found that 84% of enterprises plan to deploy OpenStack for their private cloud infrastructure.1 Implementing OpenStack in the enterprise can be challenging, as many organizations need higher levels of reliability, stability, and support than the open source community can deliver. And because OpenStack technologies don’t manage the underlying infrastructure, building a hardware foundation that meets enterprise availability and scalability needs can be a complex and daunting task. Red Hat and Cisco are committed to transforming IT by delivering proven, certified, enterprisegrade OpenStack solutions based on open foundations and industry standards. Red Hat and Cisco integrated cloud solutions simplify and accelerate enterprise OpenStack deployment, reduce cloud infrastructure costs, and protect your datacenter investments so you can focus on gaining a competitive advantage for your business.

White Paper: IDC OpenStack And Red Hat

OpenStack is an open source cloud system software project that has broad participation from the IT industry. OpenStack consists of several core modules and has established a process to incubate and develop new modules that can extend functionality. One of the main goals of being an open cloud system is interoperability, with the idea that clouds built on OpenStack should have a reasonable level of portability between them. Because OpenStack is open source, the inner workings of an OpenStack cloud and its APIs are fully transparent and anyone can participate in the development process if they choose to. As with previous open source projects such as Linux, OpenStack is becoming available in a wide range of forms. It is used by service providers to produce finished cloud services, embedded into appliances and converged infrastructure, as well as developed into commercially supported software offerings. With tremendous momentum and industry backing, OpenStack is poised to become a major factor in the emerging cloud system software market. Drawing on its experience and methodology with enterprise Linux, Red Hat is bringing to market a commercially supported and tested version of OpenStack, which will target customers that want an enterprise-ready distribution of OpenStack

FAQ: Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure

Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure is a single-subscription offering that integrates three products: Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, Red Hat CloudForms, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack® Platform.

OpenStack: Five Things Every Executive Needs to Know

Harnessing OpenStack’s open source collaboration can accelerate an organization’s cloud vision. Here are the five rules of the road.Jim Whitehurst, CEO, Red HatIn 1956, construction on the United States’ largest interstate – I-90 – began in earnest. Once the entire interstate highway system was completed, it connected all of the major metropolitan areas in the US. It has been added to as the country has grown, and still serves as the common transportation infrastructure for commerce.Part of I-90’s value is that it’s standard and open for all to use. Unlike the early days of the railroads, where track gauges differed and companies refused to interconnect their networks, interstates are open to all who wish to use them. Since auto and truck manufacturers know the standard road width, they can design common vehicles that can operate on any expressway. Users don’t have to worry about varying heights of overpasses or differences in signage.[To hear about how financial firms are managing their complex data architectures, attend the Future of the Financial Services Data Center panel at Interop 2014 in Las Vegas, March 31-April 4. You can also REGISTER FOR INTEROP HERE.]Similarly, much of the value of technology comes not from increasing performance, but common standards and openness. Take the Internet, which has sped technology adoption through a common, open standard for transmitting packets of information.Cloud computing holds the promise of doing this at a higher level through a common transportation layer and infrastructure on which applications run. By creating common standards for applications, cloud holds the potential to be disruptive and impactful.This makes cloud strategically important for financial organizations. The financial services industry tends to be technology early adopters – the perfect market for cloud. In fact, Gartner recently reported that more than 60 percent of banks worldwide will process most of their transactions in the cloud in 2014 (“Top Industries Predicts 2014: The Pressure for Fundamental Transformation Continues to Accelerate,” October, 2013).Still, many are confused about how to get there.One path is through OpenStack, an industry-wide, open source collaboration working to create cloud functionality that can run on any service provider and work well with financial businesses’ existing IT infrastructures. The result can accelerate an organization’s cloud vision. Financial executives should know several things about this new road to the cloud, including:1. Standardization is its foundation. The promise of the cloud has greatly eliminated the days when large technology providers tried to one up each other with giant, closed systems. But that promise is dependent on standardization. Thus, the more than 200 companies supporting OpenStack are striving toward a flexible, standardized platform that works interchangeably with any infrastructure. This is extremely important, especially since many financial companies have spent years investing millions of dollars in IT.2. It must offer less cost, more innovation. Most IT departments are focused on “keeping the lights on,” not providing innovative solutions. The flexibility and low cost of OpenStack helps alleviate this by freeing up IT to focus on new applications, solutions and service delivery rather than inflexible, underlying infrastructure. This allows for faster delivery of new features and products, such as online tools to help customers better manage their portfolios, and can help attract customers and increase retention.3. It needs industry-wide support.OpenStack receives widespread support from some of the most important players in the technology industry, all of which have come together to help companies break away from being locked in to a particular cloud vendor. While some of these players offer their own flavor of OpenStack, they still commit to the ideals of an open, standardized cloud. Therefore, unlike many technology purchases, it’s not really about choosing the technology itself, but selecting a vendor with the richest ecosystem and support, knowing that support extends to virtually an entire industry.4. Its success calls for change.In the same way that corporate logistics departments were radically changed by the interstate highway system, cloud computing will require significant changes to IT processes and culture. OpenStack dispenses with the historic approach to IT, which often involves people working in separate silos, in favor of a world of possibilities centered on a homogenous, inclusive infrastructure. While that’s very freeing, it necessitates new ways of thinking. CEOs must ensure their CIOs are preparing their teams for the adjustments that will need to be made.5. It’s continually emerging.The original design of the interstate system took 35 years to complete. Even then, it wasn’t done; it continues to grow and evolve. Similarly, OpenStack is an evolving technology, and companies need to be prepared for updates and maintenance. So far, we’ve gotten at least two new releases every year. That keeps OpenStack fresh and evolving — and companies on their toes.Many banks have already seen success with OpenStack. They understand what OpenStack means for the financial services industry, and are harnessing its potential. That potential is real, and will likely keep OpenStack truckin’ through the financial realm for many years.Jim Whitehurst is president and chief executive officer of Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source enterprise IT products and services. With a background in business development, finance, and global operations, Whitehurst has proven expertise in helping companies flourish – even in the most challenging economic and business environments. Since joining Red Hat in 2008, Whitehurst has grown the company, and its influence on a variety of industries, by reaching key milestones – the most notable in 2012 when Red Hat became the first $1 billion revenue open source software company. More Insights

User survey identifies leading industries and business drivers for OpenStack adoption

Cloud computing is expanding to new industries, according to the most recent OpenStack User Survey. These new areas for expansion include government/defense, film/media and telecommunications, which all increased compared to last year. Driving the latter is the growing cumulation of interest in Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). Coverage is also broadening geographically: while North America remains the area with the most deployments, Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Japan have all seen growth.Those are some one of the key takeaways from the fifth consecutive survey conducted by the OpenStack User Committee. The User Committee sounds out people working with OpenStack ahead of each Summit, which occur every six months. The results in the most recent report are from voluntary surveys answered online between March 9, 2015 – April 16, 2015. This opt-in survey is not an exhaustive catalog of OpenStack deployments, but provides valuable intelligence on usage patterns and technology decisions in real-world deployments. This post is the first in a three-part series analyzing the most recent OpenStack user survey. First up, a focus on user demographics and business drivers. Parts two and three will highlight deployment details and app developer insights, so stay tuned.Survey DemographicsSince the initial user survey launched in 2013, there have been more than 1,576 responses with more than 751 unique deployments recorded. This report analyzes the most recent data to capture the most representative sample for a current snapshot of technology choices, trends and feedback. The results in this report are from a total of 634 responses and 270 unique deployments over the last survey cycle. 230 application development-related users also filled out that section. Questions are not mandatory, so the number of respondents per question varies. Respondents are predominantly OpenStack users who are currently deploying OpenStack, as shown by the top results when they were asked about their own activities. Survey results show how these users are actually configuring their clouds and applications for their organization, rather than those who are still evaluating or testing. Industry and geographyAs more organizations step up to share their experience about their OpenStack adoption, industry representation continues to shift and evolve. In this survey, the non-IT industry users increased by 10 percent over the last survey, indicating that OpenStack is gaining traction in non-IT organizations. Government/defense and film/media both are up by 2 percent, and telecommunications increased by another percent over last year – a trend likely to continue with the increased interest in Network Functions Virtualization (NFV).Global growth remains steady compared to last survey. Hot-spot areas are Canada, up 5 percent, Australia and New Zealand, up 3 percent each, and Japan, up 1 percent. North America remains the largest source, accounting for almost half of deployments. The map below illustrates survey respondent demographics, not growth over time. Business DriversThe survey results show that lower cost is still a major factor contributing to OpenStack use with “operational efficiency” and “save money” ranking first and third as top business drivers. However, the recent trend of transforming the IT functions of organizations to become more agile and innovative and disrupting the traditional purchased software model are also well represented at second and fourth places respectively.Net Promoter ScoreAnother new question in this round of the survey was the Net Promoter Score (NPS®) question, “How likely are you to recommend OpenStack to a friend or colleague? (rank 0-10, 10 most likely.)” The NPS® score is calculated from the percentage of customers who are Promoters subtracted by the percentage who are Detractors producing a number between -100 and +100. Promoters (score 9-10) are loyal enthusiasts who will keep buying and refer others, fueling growth.Passives (score 7-8) are satisfied but unenthusiastic customers who are vulnerable to competitive offerings. Detractors (score 0-6) are unhappy customers who can damage your brand and impede growth through negative word-of-mouth.Here are the current NPS scores:Production = 53.7 percent NPSDev / Test = 40.8 percent NPSPOC = 34.7 percent NPSThe evolution of these scores will be tracked in future surveys.Behind the SurveyIn preparation for the OpenStack Summit Vancouver, OpenStack operators and application developers were asked for feedback on their experiences in the OpenStack User Survey. This is the fifth consecutive survey conducted by the User Committee prior to each Summit starting in April 2013 and the previous survey in Paris, November 2014. The goals of the survey are to generate insights based on a representative sample of OpenStack users, in order to better understand their organizational profiles, use cases and technology choices across different deployment stages and sizes. These insights are intended to provide feedback to the broader community, and to arm technical leaders and contributors with better data to make decisions.MethodologyOver the last two years, managing the User Survey and analyzing results had become a large task for the User Committee even with support of Foundation Staff. For this and the previous round, it has been conducted with an external, independent research firm, Moor Insights & Strategy, to help analyze and report the data. The survey format this time is the result of a deep dive of their work, using the experience in the last survey. This should provide the foundation to achieve greater insights moving forward. Specific updates and methodology as applied to the latest report:In this version of the survey, we decided to look at any surveys that were created or updated between March 9, 2015 – April 16, 2015. This provides us with a smaller, but more representative sample current state of OpenStack deployments.Every survey we make many small changes to the survey, based on developments in OpenStack and after analysis of the results (the full list can be found at the end of this report). For example, questions with lists of drivers are updated, a few questions are added based on new trends and requests from the development teams for further input on hot issues or new features, and some areas are clarified based on analysis about whether they are being understood.One big change this time is the introduction of additional logic to ensure that only questions that are relevant to the user will be displayed. For example, if the deployment is using Swift, we will ask four additional questions about Swift – whereas others will not be shown those questions. This is important to ensure the survey is kept as short as possible, and generally improves the quality of results by limiting the respondee size to just those who have a valid answer.The OpenStack User Committee is led by Subbu Allamaraju, Tim Bell and Jon Proulx. This core group provides oversight and guidance to a number of working groups that target specific areas for improvement.

How to govern a project on the scale of OpenStack

How an open source project is governed can matter just as much as the features it supports, the speed at which it runs, or the code that underlies it. Some open source projects have what we might call a “benevolent dictator for life.” Others are outgrowths of corporate projects that, while open, still have their goals and code led by the company that manages it. And of course, there are thousands of projects out there that are written and managed by a single person or a small group of people for whom governance is less of an issue than insuring project sustainability.Control matters. Too little, and a project flounders without direction. Too much, or the wrong kind of direction, and a project can lose support or fork over minor issues, potentially leading to a fractured community. While not all forking is bad, when forking happens because developers can’t get along and resolve their differences, it’s probably not a good thing.So how do you manage a global project encompassing the work of thousands of people working at hundreds of companies worldwide? For big projects like this, a foundation model sometimes makes more sense to ensure fair and equitable representation while keeping the project on track to meet the needs of everyone who uses it. The foundation model is used by OpenStack and helps create a governance structure that keeps any one party from taking too much control.OpenStack hasn’t always been run this way. It started out as a collaboration between NASA and Rackspace when the two organizations realized they were working toward similar goals and would benefit from collaboration. Recognizing the value in what they had created, and that broader participation would lead to faster development and a more versatile project though wide participation, Rackspace created the OpenStack Foundation as a nonprofit organization to manage the project, to be governed by broad coalition of companies with similar interests in open cloud infrastructure. Started in 2011, it was September of 2012 when the reigns were officially passed over.The OpenStack governance structure allows participation from a wide group of organizations and individuals and is subdivided into various committees to ensure that the right people are in charge of the right parts. Primarily consisting of three committees—a board of directors, a technical committee, and a user committee—the OpenStack Foundation has roles for many different types of contributors in their structure. The Board of Directors oversees financial decisions and long-term strategy, while the technical committee—not surprisingly—gives technical direction, and the user committee helps ensure the project is meeting the needs of organizations working with the software on the ground.But OpenStack isn’t really a single project, it’s a group of several tightly integrated projects providing services that together give lift to a cloud. Each of these projects is headed by a program team lead (PTL) who maintains plans through each development cycle. Other key functions within OpenStack that aren’t themselves software components (documentation, quality assurance, and release cycle management, for example) also elect PTLs. As OpenStack is on a twice-yearly release schedule, these leaders are likewise elected two times a year to oversee their individual component through one cycle.All of this brings us to tomorrow, April 11, which marks the end of the most recent PTL elections. As the Icehouse release of OpenStack nears completion for a planned release on April 17, and the Juno Design Summit sits just around the corner, these elections will help set the direction for the work done over the next six months. Fittingly, the electorate for PTL elections are the contributors to each project. Did you have code in a recent release? Then you’re eligible to participate.Of the twenty-one projects which are electing PTLs, six are contested. While some might see contests as signs of troubling disagreement, they’re actually a healthy part of the process. They ensure that projects are headed in the direction that contributors want to see them go, that each project is managed by someone deemed capable to do the job (and being a project team lead is definitely a job), and they help facilitate a robust discussion on what needs to be done in the coming release cycle. Everyone in the OpenStack community should be excited to see the results and find out where things will be headed in the next six months.For more on the PTL elections or the candidates running, see the OpenStack wiki.